Removing Block Paving Moss From My Driveway

Introduction

I recently spent half a day removing block paving moss from my driveway. The paving, laid in 1993, has been cleaned more than once but moss soon grows under damp conditions.

Because the blocks have a chamfered edge there is a V shaped recess at the junction between blocks. This is a space where moss can grow, and boy does it grow. Within this gap moss doesn’t get worn away by traffic (cars or feet).

Given a good wet period the moss swells in size until it sticks up above the blocks. Under those conditions it can become very slippery under foot giving me good reason to remove it.

You might ask why I’m only discussing moss and not regular weeds. That’s because I use weed killer during the spring and summer so I’m just left with moss in the autumn and winter. This is because regular weed killers are not effective against moss. Moss killer is effective at turning it black but at some point the dead moss needs removing.

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What Is A Retractable Clothes Washing Line?

Introduction

Consider the benefits of having a retractable clothes washing line:

  • Coiling it up in a box keeps it clean.
  • If you have a nice vista you won’t want it permanently scared with one or more lines cutting across it.

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Retractable Clothes Washing Line Repair

Introduction

What is a retractable clothes washing line? Find out here.

My Past Experience With A Retractable Clothes Washing Line

I’ve used a retractable clothes washing line for many years but my original one, from B&Q, came to the end of it’s life in 2015. The parts which tensioned the line had broken halfway through its life. I fixed it by tying a loop in the line so it could be hung over an adjacent hook. Surprisingly the bulk of the loop didn’t get in the way when it was allowed to coil up.

This original line could be removed from its support post in the winter by lifting it off its bracket. This was a good feature I required in any replacement. So when I couldn’t replace it with the exact same model I took a good look at what was available online before I settled on one. Here is Google’s selection.

My Current Experience With A Retractable Clothes Washing Line

In the summer of 2016 I installed a Minky Retractable Clothes Washing Line in the garden. It worked well until a couple of weeks ago when I heard a clattering noise outside and a cry of desperation from my wife. The new retractable clothes washing line had become detached from its wall bracket and a load of heavy wet washing was strewn along the garden path. Continue reading “Retractable Clothes Washing Line Repair”

Radio Controlled Wall Clock In My Shed

Introduction

I have for some time wanted a reliable time piece outside my house. I don’t actually require an exact time outside anymore than I do elsewhere, but I do need to get the grass cut by teatime. So, I have acquired a Radio Controlled Wall Clock for my shed.

I have had the difficulty of not being able to see any of the indoor clocks easily through the windows from outside the house. Although I have a wall clock in the kitchen I have to open the door to see it. Reflections on the windows make it difficult to read otherwise.

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Securing Shed Doors

Introduction

ERA Hasp & Staple
Hasp & Staple of the type cut open on two of my sheds

In 1997 both of my sheds were burgled. I thought I’d made them secure enough. I’d used hasps with the thickest staples I could find on the market (similar to these) and disc padlocks with hardened shackles. But the burglars cut through each staple in two places making a gap through which the padlock shackle could pass. My advisers suggested the burglar used a hydraulic bolt cropper. The burglar cut through steel as thick as a man’s little finger. So I took securing shed doors very seriously and made immediate improvements.

While on the subject of sheds why not take a look at my post about putting a “Radio Controlled Wall Clock In My Shed”. — HC

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Repairing Rotten Garden Seat Legs

Introduction

I have two teak garden seats which spend all their time outdoors on the lawn or patio. They go back to the 1980’s and the bottom of all the legs has rotted where they are perpetually in contact with the ground. I first noticed the problem while I had them upside down when I was cleaning and sanding them ready for repainting. I dug a penknife into the underside of the end of each leg only to find the wood was soft and easily dug out. I had painted them with exterior paint several times over the years but this wood wasn’t good to paint anymore.

I had noticed a deterioration in the wood previously when I painted them but just put plenty of paint on the bottom of the legs after letting the wood dry out. The problematic area was in the bottom 5mm to 10mm of each leg and It had got to the point where the wood was crumbling away and the legs were no longer all of the same length. I had to find a method of repairing rotten garden seat legs. Continue reading “Repairing Rotten Garden Seat Legs”

Sighting A Straight Line

Introduction

I would say sighting a straight line is a common practice used by builders and joiners to determine if a piece of timber is straight or bowed. It can be used to test any length of timber, but long pieces in particular, and requires no tools just eyesight with a good depth of field enabling focusing along the whole length of timber to be checked. Continue reading “Sighting A Straight Line”