Using Bread Maker Panasonic SD206

Introduction

I made this video of myself using a bread maker (Panasonic SD206) in 2001 but had no means of publishing it back then. So I have decided to publish it now so that the effort wasn’t completely wasted.

I hope it helps people who are considering getting a bread maker but are not sure how one is used in practice. Continue reading “Using Bread Maker Panasonic SD206”

Oh No! Not Square Plates Again!

Introduction

Controversy rages over what shape of plate food should be served on: Square plates are an ‘abomination’ according to a report about MasterChef judge William Sitwell’s view in the Telegraph. Apparently Mr Sitwell is to hold a ‘Square Plate’ amnesty at the Towcester Food Festival on the 7th and 8th of June 2014. He doesn’t plan to destroy them Greek style. He’s going to give them to charity. This means they will still be in circulation and may be re-used. I can’t really stand a round plant pot on a square plate can you?

The square plate issue came to light in the BBC MasterChef competition when Mr Sitwell (a judge by invitation) made it clear he didn’t like a contestant’s food because it was served on a square plate. He is of the opinion that a square plate suggests a chef using one raises presentation above flavour. Continue reading “Oh No! Not Square Plates Again!”

One Pint Glass Tankards Seen In Dalston

Has a new era begun now One Pint Glass Tankards have been seen in Dalston?

“One pint glass tankards seen in Dalston pubs in East London such as The Shacklewell Arms.”

A lengthy report from the BBC tells that these drinking vessels may be returning to some pubs frequented by young people in London. They disappeared from pubs around 2001 when the company making them, Ravenhead Glass in St Helens, closed their factory. They are now made in Turkey apparently.

Not everyone is so nostalgic. Some think that the old glass tankard is not so good for the beer as a modern narrow glass. The old ones have a poor open surface to volume ratio, I believe, allowing the bubbles to escape too soon after the pint is pulled. Yes these pubs PULL their pints.

See the video below, from St. Chad’s College Bar, Durham (not in Dalston), which shows how a Real Ale should be dispensed. Unfortunately an ordinary beer glass is being used here, not a Glass Tankard.

St. Chad’s Bar, St Chad’s College, Durham University, 18 N Bailey, Durham DH1 3RH.

Dry Ice In Water

Observing The Reaction Of Dry Ice In Water

I always wanted to try this (put dry ice in water) and last year I got the opportunity. When I bought some meat from Donald Russell it was delivered packed in dry ice (frozen CO2) i.e. solid carbon dioxide. This dry ice was used to keep the meat cool in transit. The meat and dry ice are transported in a polystyrene box which provides lots of insulation. However the heat does percolate a package like this and the dry ice sublimates, but usually there is some left on arrival. If not the meat temperature may rise too high. So I had a source of dry ice.

The first thing I wanted to do as soon as the meat was stored in a cool place was put the dry ice in water and watch it bubble away and the vapour flow out and down the side of the container. I caught it on video below:

Teapot Cleaning Methods

Should you practice teapot cleaning or not?

Some people think teapot cleaning is unnecessary and that it spoils the flavour of the tea. If they have traditional brown earthenware teapots they probably don’t see all the tannin stains on the inside. With a stainless steel teapot you see them all and they start to form very quickly from new, or after cleaning. Tannin makes a teapot look disgusting. Not something you want guests to see when you make them a cuppa, or when they make one for you.

Teapot cleaning can be avoided by keeping it clean. One way is to make sure it’s emptied and rinsed out immediately after use. Letting it stand with old tea in it until the next mash allows the tannin deposits to grow. Continue reading “Teapot Cleaning Methods”

How To Open A Wine Bottle Without A Corkscrew

This Is How To Open A Wine Bottle Without A Corkscrew

It would appear to be a very simple process to open a wine bottle without a corkscrew. Just look at this video to learn how:

If you aren’t happy with that method try this one. There probably aren’t many corkscrews where this chap comes from:

Of course the British way is the simplest. Only buy wine bottles with screw caps and just unscrew them.

Reference:

The Telegraph.

Another Method Of Opening Food Cans

Introduction

The video here demonstrates another method of opening food cans without a traditional can opener.

This Is Another Method Of Opening Food Cans

This is another method for opening food cans without a can opener. It involves grinding off the folded over edge of the can. The grinding material is in this case is flat concrete laid on the ground. I must warn you it does get a bit messy when the can begins to open:

Reference:

The Telegraph – opening food cans without a can opener.

Spilling Juice From Cartons or ‘Tetra Paks®’

Introduction

This post contains instructions on how to avoid spilling juice from cartons or Tetra Paks®, with a rectangular cross-section, while opening or lifting them. It’s quite natural to grip cartons by the easiest method (the broad sides) while opening them, or lifting them when they’re still full, causing the contents to pour or squirt out inadvertently. Cartons with a square cross section are indifferent to the sides that are gripped when lifting or pouring.

Situation

You go to the refrigerator and take out a new cool carton of juice. You hold it firmly and take off the seal and juice spurts out at you and runs down the side of the carton, or you pick it up after removing the seal and juice pours out as you grip it. Before you’ve got it in a glass you’re in a mess. This is usually caused by the way you grip the carton. Continue reading “Spilling Juice From Cartons or ‘Tetra Paks®’”

Finbarr’s Restaurant In Durham

Durham

“It’s a bit nippy, a bit dull and there have been a few showers.” – Helpful Colin, May 2012

In Durham there are lots of narrow hilly streets and the river has a big hairpin bend in it so you can walk over one bridge and after a short distance without doubling back walk over the same river again. The Market Place is pedestrianized and on quite a steep slope, but it’s all very clean with pedestrianized streets leading off it. Even the Market Hall on one side of it has a severely sloping floor inside it and a two storey staircase to get up to it on one side. Here, in the featured image, is a nice view of the River Wear taken from Elvet Bridge. I presume the rowers are sporting university types.

Finbarr’s Restaurant

We finished the day with dinner at Finbarr’s Restaurant, No.4 on Trip Advisor’s Durham Restaurants (at the time of writing), and deservedly so. It has a very nice ambiance and was well attended on Friday night. It also has a very nice bar area. NOTE: It can be difficult to find. Walk to the end of Waddington Street furthest from the town where there is an Arriva bus depot. To the right of it is a hotel through an archway. Finbarr’s Restaurant is around the back of the hotel off the car park and cannot be seen from the street. There is a sign for the restaurant on the left as you enter from the street by the bus depot.

DELICIOUS RECOMMENDED FOOD

Finbarrs Restaurant Durham
Finbarr’s Restaurant, Waddington Street, Durham.

Footnote: Sadly it slipped down to No.10 on Trip Advisor’s Durham Restaurants by 24/12/2014.