Mushroom Collection of Autumn 2014

Disclaimer From Helpful Colin:

“I take no responsibility for anyone choosing to eat or use in any way Ceps, Toadstools or Mushrooms of any kind. I am not an authority on Ceps, Toadstools or Mushrooms and do not know if any Cep, Toadstool or Mushroom mentioned on this site is safe to eat or touch. I would advise anyone who touches a Cep, Toadstool or Mushroom to wash their hands afterwards to ensure they don’t go on to contaminate:

  • food (human or animal).
  • food preparation surfaces.
  • any item that will be put in a person or animal’s mouth, e.g. a babies dummy, fork, sweet, chewing gum, cigarette, cigar, pipe, dog chew, dog toy or ball.
  • any part of a person or animal’s body, e.g. eyes, nose, mucus membranes.”

Mushroom – Edible Or Not?

While walking my dog Leo this morning (17th October 2014) I found this cep – toadstool – mushroom under a Silver Birch tree. I haven’t seen one like it before so I photographed it with my mobile phone. Continue reading “Mushroom Collection of Autumn 2014”

Can Trees Be Transferred To Other Formers?

Introduction

At the end of my article entitled: Are Trees Ectoparasites That Grow On Wood? I asked this question: Can Trees Be Transferred To Other Formers? The first article discusses how trees may or may not be parasites that grow on wood. I now wonder if the growing part of a tree can be completely stripped from the wood upon which it grows and made to adhere to, and flourish, on anther former: e.g. a concrete or steel frame.

Application – Transferring Trees To Other Formers

Why would anyone want to transfer trees to alternative formers other than the original wooden trunks they grew on? Maybe to create timber of a particular shape. It would have to be supple enough to be fitted to the new shape, but if it continued to grow it would presumably deposit wood onto that new former as the years progressed and its living fibres died to form new timber underneath. After several years that new timber could be harvested with its desired shape.

Are Trees Parasites That Grow On Wood?

Introduction

I have asked myself for some time, “Are trees parasites that grow on wood? i.e. ectoparasites.” (An ectoparasite lives on the outside of its host.) Mainly this is because only the outer layers of a tree are alive. The inner part of the tree – the wood or timber – is dead. It was alive in previous years but in later years it is only the support for new growth. Consider all the old hollowed out trees: e.g. those hollowed out by wood rot. The outer layers continue to grow year on year. It is only when the outer layers are severed so that sap cannot get up the tree from the outer layers of the roots to the outer layers of the twigs with the leaves attached that the tree dies.

Are Trees Parasites That Grow On Wood?

I Found A Good Example

trees parasites
Linden Tree Viewed From The Front.
trees parasites
Linden Tree Viewed From Behind.

I have recently seen one of the best examples of tree growth behaving like an ectoparasite on the surface of wood in my local park (Alvaston Park, Derby, UK). You can see it here in these two pictures of a linden tree showing the front and back of the tree.

This one tree has two strips of living bark running up it. The front view shows quite a narrow strip running up it, and the view from behind shows a wider strip. The tree has been truncated at the top by the park keeper at some time.

The Oxford Dictionary describes a parasite as: An organism which lives in or on another organism (its host) and benefits by deriving nutrients at the other’s expense. So on the strength of that description a tree is not a parasite since it isn’t taking nutrients from a living host at its expense (unlike mistletoe). The wood is dead.

Can Trees Be Transferred To Other Formers?

See my article of the same title: Can Trees Be Transferred To Other Formers?