Site Specific FAQs


Select a question below to see its answer.

In many cases (but not all) you can see a larger version of a picture by selecting it.

If you’re using a PC with a mouse just move the pointer over the picture and check if it turns into an icon of a ‘hand with a pointing finger’ thus: Hand-Icon

If so then select the picture. Usually another browser tab will open to display an enlarged version of the same image. Occasionally the enlarged image may appear in the same tab instead of the post. To get back to the post select the browser’s Back button.

On a phone or tablet just touch the picture to find out if a larger image is available.

In both cases use normal browsing techniques to close the new tab and return to the original post.

Most videos that I make are stored on Vimeo’s servers and I arrange for them to be available for Full Screen viewing when the appropriate icon in the bottom right corner is selected.

Vimeo Videos

You can see Vimeo’s Full Screen Icon here (with 4 arrows pointing outwards): Vimeo-Full-Screen

To reduce a Full Screen Vimeo video back to its original size select this icon in the bottom right corner (with 4 arrows pointing inwards): Vimeo-Shrink

YouTube Videos

When you want to watch a YouTube video in Full Screen mode select this icon in the bottom right corner (with 4 arrowheads pointing outwards): YouTube-Full-Screen

To reduce a Full Screen YouTube video back to its original size select this icon in the bottom right corner (with 4 arrowheads pointing inwards): YouTube-Shrink

Note:

If I have embedded a video published and controlled by someone else (be it on Vimeo, YouTube or any other site) and they have prevented Full Screen viewing then I cannot enable it.

I list Footnotes at the bottom of a post or page in a numerical list under the ‘Footnotes’ header. Then where an item of text in the post or page refers to a specific footnote the text item is immediately followed by the appropriate footnote number in superscript (raised above the line of text.) The item of text and footnote number is coloured blue and forms a link to the appropriate footnote at the bottom of the page. So if the reader selects that link they will be taken to the appropriate footnote.

First select and view the post whose comments are to be searched.

Browsers such as Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge and Google Chrome have the ability to search text on the current page. So that function can be used to search all the post and comment text on the page being viewed.

Unfortunately everything is searched but it does allow the commenter, date and text of comments to be searched.

In any of these browsers select the appropriate tab to display the post to be examined:

Using Microsoft Internet Explorer 11:

  1. If the ‘Menu bar’ is not showing press the ‘Alt’ key, while Internet Explorer has the focus, to show it temporarily. Else right click on another browser bar and select ‘Menu bar’ from the list to show it permanently.
  2. Go to the ‘Menu bar’ and select ‘Edit’, then from the drop down list select ‘Find on this page…’. The ‘Find’ bar opens with a field for entering the search string.
  3. As the search term’s string is entered all instances of that string on the entire page will be highlighted with a yellow background except the current one which will have a blue background and white text. (Note: colours may vary according to your PC, Browser and WordPress colour settings.) As more characters of the search term are entered the number of instances of it will usually diminish.
  4. Each instance of the search term can be found by:
    1. Scrolling the page while looking at the highlighted text,
    2. Selecting the ‘Next’ or ‘Previous’ words to move forward or backward through the highlighted text.

Using Microsoft Edge:

  1. Select the horizontal ellipsis (3 dots) under the window closing ‘X’ at the top right of the window to produce a drop down menu.
  2. From the drop down menu select ‘Find on page’. This will introduce a search field near the top left of the browser window into which the search term can be entered.
  3. As the search term’s string is entered all instances of that string on the entire page will be highlighted with a yellow background except the current one which will have a blue background and white text. (Note: colours may vary according to your PC, Browser and WordPress colour settings.) As more characters of the search term are entered the number of instances of it will usually diminish.
  4. Each instance of the search term can be found by:
    1. Scrolling the page while looking at the highlighted text,
    2. Selecting the right (>) or left (<) chevrons to move forward or backward through the highlighted text.

Using Google Chrome:

  1. Select the vertical ellipsis (3 dots) under the window closing ‘X’ at the top right of the window to produce a drop down menu.
  2. From the drop down menu select ‘Find’. This will introduce a floating search field under the right hand end of the Address bar into which the search term can be entered.
  3. As the search term’s string is entered all instances of that string on the entire page will be highlighted with a yellow background except the current one which will have an orange background. (Note: colours may vary according to your PC, Browser and WordPress colour settings.) As more characters of the search term are entered the number of instances of it will usually diminish.
  4. Each instance of the search term can be found by:
    1. Scrolling the page while looking at the highlighted text,
    2. Selecting the up () or down () chevrons to move backward or forward through the highlighted text.

To use the built in search engine:

  1. Enter your search string (e.g. all or part of a word or number) in the full width search field below the Main Menu, (or to the top right on small screens, e.g. mobiles.)
  2. The search engine will attempt to auto complete your string and show a scrollable list of results so far with their featured images below the search field.
  3. Scroll down the list and choose the item you want to read.

Notes:

The search field can be cleared by selecting (clicking) the ‘x’ to the right.

The list of results can be hidden by selecting the background or other items.

I find replacing the current page with a temporary visit to another page is a nuisance. So I usually arrange for links to images and other web pages to open in a new tab or window leaving the original page where it was. If this doesn’t happen then I might have made a programmatic error so feel free to comment.

If the link is to another place on the same post or page that will NOT open in another tab or window unless at the point of selection an appropriate choice made from a context menu. e.g. When the right button of a mouse is clicked on the link and ‘Open in another Tab or Window’ is selected by the user.

Flashes were introduced in the margin in 2014 to highlight various paragraphs. Since 2016 these are now embedded in the text or appear as normal images (not in the margin).

Yes some flashes give warnings which I hope are self explanatory. These types of flashes are intended to remain permanently in the text.

Here are some examples:

helpfulcolin.com
helpfulcolin.com
helpfulcolin.com
helpfulcolin.com

Other types of flashes are not so serious. For example:

helpfulcolin.com
helpfulcolin.com
helpfulcolin.com
helpfulcolin.com

See FAQs about these Flashes also:

Flashes were introduced in the margin in 2014 to highlight various paragraphs. Since 2016 these are now embedded in the text or appear as normal images.

The helpfulcolin.com flash indicates that one or more paragraphs have been added to the article containing new information since it was originally written.

This is for the benefit of those who have already read the article and are just refreshing their knowledge of it and may be interested in any changes to it. These flashes are intended to be removed after a month or so since they have no benefit to new readers.

Flashes were introduced in the margin in 2014 to highlight various paragraphs. Since 2016 these are now embedded in the text or appear as normal images.

The helpfulcolin.com flash indicates that one or more paragraphs or images have been amended since the article was originally written.

This is for the benefit of those who have already read the article and are just refreshing their knowledge of it and may be interested in any changes to it. These flashes are intended to be removed after a month or so since they have no benefit to new readers.

Flashes were introduced in the margin in 2014 to highlight various paragraphs. Since 2016 these are now embedded in the text or appear as normal images.

The helpfulcolin.com flash indicates that the post has been edited in some way. It isn’t as specific as the ‘NEW ADDITION’ or ‘AMENDED’ flashes.

This is for the benefit of those who have already read the article and are just refreshing their knowledge of it and may be interested in any changes to it. These flashes are intended to be removed after a month or so since they have no benefit to new readers.

Yes there is some logic to the way lists are written on this site. I created a set of rules which I want to follow. I read various articles on writing lists first and then devised these rules.

Using the built in search engine is often the quickest way to find a string in an article (on a page or in a post) on this site. This is especially so if you have visited the site before and know of a word (or number) that is written into a post. See FAQ: “How do I use the built-in search engine?”

If the string is in a comment then it will have to be found using the text search engine built into the browser. See FAQ: “How can I search through the comments?”

There are no pages because infinite scrolling has been deployed on this site. Posts from the past (in reverse date order) are loaded as the reader scrolls down the screen.

If the reader wants to read posts published in the distant past they should select from the Post Archives made available in the right hand column.

Post Archives have a hierarchy in the order:

  1. Year,
  2. Months in that year,
  3. Posts in that month.

The numbers in parenthesis adjacent to the months are the quantity of posts published in each month.

Alternatively posts can be selected according to their Category. Categories can also be selected from the right hand column. The quantity of posts in each category is shown in parenthesis adjacent to each category.