Dual Flush Toilet Cistern Lid Removal

Introduction

If you have tried dual flush toilet cistern lid removal you may have found that it was held down by something. But what? There are no clips or screws.

Traditional porcelain cisterns flushed with a handle have their lids held down by gravity.

Some Dual Flush toilet cisterns, like my Armitage Shanks1 Ascania have their lids held in place by the Geberit Flush Button Mechanism2. The Button Socket, mounted in the cistern lid, is held down by a plastic screw attached to an internal part within the cistern.

This article gives advice on this type of dual flush toilet cistern lid removal. Continue reading “Dual Flush Toilet Cistern Lid Removal”

Dripping noise from a rainwater spout

Introduction

This post refers specifically to downpipes with a square cross section. It shows how to modify a rainwater downpipe spout (shoe) to stop a dripping noise when the drip starts within the outlet shoe. For drips that drop off the guttering outlet and fall all the way down to the bottom of a straight downpipe and hit the shoe you may get immediate relief from the noise by removing the shoe and letting the drip fall on the ground, roof or whatever is below the downpipe. In the long term this may cause excessive splashing under heavy rain which could cause damage to foundations or brickwork mortar, because the water is not directed away from the building. The drip needs to be guided to the side of the downpipe so it will run down the pipe and only tend to drip at the bottom where it can be dealt with by the method described here. Any method devised must not prevent leaves and dirt from being washed all the way down the pipe or a blockage will ensue.

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How Many Parts Make A Shower Head?

How Many Parts?

You may be surprised to learn that the shower head that came with my Mira Sport Thermostatic Shower is made from 22 separate parts. If you count them in the featured image above you will see 21 but take note that the main body of the shower head, on the right, is made from two inseparable parts of plastic.

I can also tell you that the main body of the shower head retains water after use. Some drops can be removed by shaking it in various ways but some always remains inside. If the shower isn’t used regularly this water will become stagnant and may hold dangerous bacteria. I would recommend turning the shower on at least once per week to refresh the water in the shower head.

This all came to light when I wanted to do a good job of cleaning mould and calcium off the shower head. I felt the best job would be done by dismantling it and cleaning all the parts individually since some mould looked as if it had penetrated inside.

Continue reading “How Many Parts Make A Shower Head?”

Should You Worry About Your Bath Overflowing?

“Me, worry about my bath overflowing? Its got an overflow pipe.”

“Oh! Has it?”

Why you DO NEED to worry about your bath overflowing?

I know someone who has had a bad experience with a bath overflowing, but it wasn’t their bath overflowing. It was in a flat two floors above. Interestingly the flat in between on the floor immediately below the bath didn’t get wet. How can that happen?

Well lets start with the overflowing bath. The person, whose bath it was, admitted it had overflowed but not very much. I suspect this means that the water did actually run over the rim of the bath. That means it rose above the bath overflow outlet (assuming there was one.) On my bath, water would start to go down the overflow pipe when it is within 8cm of the top of the bath. The top of my bath is 8cm above the bottom of the overflow. So if it is full to the point where it will overflow the rim of the bath the head of water pushing out through the overflow will be 0.08m whereas the head of water from the water level in my header tank in the loft is 2m. Alternative forms of hot water provision can be at mains pressure which usually has a lot more than 2m head. My point is that the tap’s pipe diameter and overflow pipe diameter are similar but the input pressure is a lot higher than the output pressure. Consequently baths can fill faster than they can overflow. So eventually a system with no faults may eventually overflow the rim of the bath if the taps are turned full on. So DON’T LEAVE BATH TAPS RUNNING WHEN YOU LEAVE THE BATHROOM. You may be distracted and forget about them. Continue reading “Should You Worry About Your Bath Overflowing?”