Repairing Rotten Garden Seat Legs

Introduction

I have two teak garden seats which spend all their time outdoors on the lawn or patio. They go back to the 1980’s and the bottom of all the legs has rotted where they are perpetually in contact with the ground. I first noticed the problem while I was cleaning and sanding them ready for repainting and had them upside down. I dug a penknife into the underside of the end of each leg only to find the wood was soft and easily dug out. I had painted them with exterior paint several times over the years but this wood wasn’t good to paint anymore. I had noticed a deterioration in the wood previously when I painted them but just put plenty of paint on the bottom of the legs after letting the wood dry out. The problematic area was in the bottom 5mm to 10mm of each leg and It had got to the point where the wood was crumbling away and the legs were no longer all of the same length. I had to find a method of repairing rotten garden seat legs. Continue reading “Repairing Rotten Garden Seat Legs”

Sighting A Straight Line

Introduction

I would say sighting a straight line is a common practice used by builders and joiners to determine if a piece of timber is straight or bowed. It can be used to test any length of timber, but long pieces in particular, and requires no tools just eyesight with a good depth of field enabling focusing along the whole length of timber to be checked. Continue reading “Sighting A Straight Line”

Supporting Broken Timber Fence Posts

Introduction

A friend of mine has a fence at the bottom of his garden made from six 6′ x 6′ (1.8m x 1.8m) interwoven panels erected on a three feet high bank of soil. His neighbours garden starts beyond the bank of soil. So work could be done on the bank to support the fence. The panels are fixed to 3inch2 (75mm2) posts dug into the bank of soil. Over a two year period the posts snapped one by one, at or just below ground level, due to wind pressure and rot. This has left the fence with broken timber fence posts throughout. Because they snapped one at a time the other posts held the fence up but the panels attached to the broken timber fence post were floppy and moved about in the wind begging to be repaired. So I repaired it only to find another snapped a few weeks later. Over time they all snapped and had to be repaired by the same or similar method. One end post has a simple horizontal stay going from midway up the post to a tree about two feet behind and to one side of it.

Ideally the posts would be replaced but I offered to do a quick fix as each one broke. I attached two diagonal stays from the middle of each post and two horizontal stays near the bottom. These stays cannot be seen from my friend’s garden because they are behind his fence. They have lasted for a year on all the posts with one exception. Continue reading “Supporting Broken Timber Fence Posts”