Visual Basic .NET Radio Buttons get auto-clicked

I was up until 01:20 this morning debugging code in VB.NET 2010. For hours I thought there was something amiss with my math or logic when a calculation in a secondary window which was affected by Radio Buttons kept giving an erroneous result.

The Problem – Visual Basic .NET Radio Buttons

At first I thought I was trying to use public variables in the wrong way and completely re-wrote the code only to get the same error. Eventually I found for myself by debugging with several breakpoints that when the secondary window was opened there was an automatic click on one of the Visual Basic .NET Radio Buttons (RadioButton1). Continue reading “Visual Basic .NET Radio Buttons get auto-clicked”

Removing A Bra Wire From A Washing Machine

Introduction

“Oh no! I’ll have to spend the rest of the day removing a bra wire from a washing machine now!”

The exclamation above probably describes how you felt if you ever heard a “tick, tick, tick” when your washing machine rotated slowly followed by a loud rasping sound when it speeded up.

Here is the featured image if you cannot see it.

removing a bra wire from a washing machine
Mangled Bra Wire

It can be very expensive to pay someone for removing a bra wire from a washing machine. The wire normally gets caught under the heating element which is situated at the bottom, between the inner drum (the one you can see through the door with all the holes) and the outer drum which surrounds it and holds the water. The wire can lie dormant and not touch the inner drum, but if you know it’s in there then that’s worrying. It can catch on the holes of the drum in such a way that it sticks through one, in which case you can probably grab it with your pliers and pull it out. If it pops through a hole while it is whizzing around it could do serious damage to the parts it is caught on, between the drums, or it could puncture the hose connecting the outer drum to the pump.

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Phishing Email NOT From TESCO Bank

This phishing email proclaims to come from:

Tesco Personal Finance customerservice@consumercardservicing.tescofinance.com.

As you can see from the image of the email content below if you were to click on the link:

http://www.tescobank.co.uk/1/2/TESCOCAM10;&user=% colin.ride@btinternet.com % you will not go to a Tesco website. Look carefully and you will see that the real URL behind the embedded link is displayed above the hand pointer when the hand hovers over the link in the text.

Tesco Bank Phishing Email 1

In the facsimile above the obscured paragraph reads:

During our regularly scheduled account maintenance and verification
procedures, our records show your Tesco Credit Card Account registered
to email user ” < the recipient’s email address > ” has been inactive for some days.
To securely confirm and reactivate your account please click on the link bellow:

You will in fact go to:

http://www.4gamer.es/images/tools/testes/tes1/login4.htm

This is not somewhere I’m going and I wouldn’t advise anyone to go there. You might pick up a nasty cold. It looks like a games website in Spain (the domain is “es”). I presume the page looks like a Tesco Finance log-in page. When you enter your log-in credentials the owner of the page can save them and use them to log-in to your real Tesco Finance account and play a dirty trick on you.

This email was delivered to my MS Outlook Inbox from a btinternet.com account. It wasn’t picked up by them as spam nor was it detected by Norton Internet Security, presumably because it is a new kid on the block.

I have forwarded the email to TESCO Bank for their perusal.

So now you know how to check a suspect email. Good luck and watch out.

Spilt Paint On My Patio

Introduction

“Oh dear! My quarter full tin of paint, for hardwood windows, was resting on a sheet of cardboard when a gust of wind lifted the cardboard and tipped over my paint pot.”

The spilt paint on my patio slabs created a 20cm mahogany puddle with splashes around it. There would have been photos but I had to swear first and then get on with cleaning it up.

How I Cleaned Up The Spilt Paint On My Patio

I began the clean-up process of removing the spilt paint on my patio without delay, before the paint puddle spread out or started to set. This is how I dealt with it. I went and got a roll of paper towels (a kitchen roll) and ripped off two sheets still joined together. I folded it double and with both hands I scooped it towards the middle of the puddle from the far side, then with more paper towels I scooped it towards the middle of the puddle from the near side leaving the tissue in the middle to soak it up. I then used more paper towels to pick up the messy towels and take them to the refuse bin. I then repeated this doing it in a way that would not spread the pint outwards. I always moved the paper to the middle of the puddle. Then I cleaned my hands so that I didn’t spread it around.

After I had removed a lot of the paint I poured paintbrush cleaner (the variety that can be washed off with water) on the remaining paint puddle and the splashes. I then used a hand-held scrubbing brush to work the paintbrush cleaner into the paint. I added more paintbrush cleaner and I could see it washed the slab where I had poured it so that I could see the concrete colour showing through. This was a good sign that the paintbrush cleaner was working to dissolve and remove the paint. By this time several slabs looked to be in a terrible state, but having done this before (using paintbrush cleaner to remove wet paint from concrete) I knew that the time had come to hose it all away.

I did just that. I washed this area of my patio with clean water from a hosepipe. The paintbrush cleaner went milky, as it does when mixed with water, but after plenty of water was used the patio was as clean as it was before the paint was spilt.

My only remaining problem was – the hosepipe had splashed the window I had just painted, doh!

Dining On A Steam Train At The Great Central Railway

Introduction

This time we (my wife and I) enjoyed a day on the trains at the Great Central Railway based at Loughborough Station. We went dining on a steam train at the Great Central Railway on 26th May 2012. This pleasure was a Christmas gift from our son. We had 1st class tickets to travel up and down the line during the day, as we pleased, together with lunch on “The South Yorkshireman”.

We were able to choose the date when we used the ticket so we chose a very good one with wall to wall sunshine. You can see our table in the Restaurant Car in this Featured Image if you haven’t already seen it. (This photo was taken from the outside through a window hence the reflections.)

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